Hacking Rhetoric

Weekly Blog

2 Comments

I remember someone mentioning in class the most common passwords to use for their accounts. While I was browsing through Google, I found out that Adobe had gotten hacked. This had apparently affected more than 150 million user accounts (active and inactive) according to a computer security firm. Adobe addressed that the hackers stole data and affected 38 active million users. The funny and exasperating part was that the most popular password for those users were “123456”. An estimation of two million people had set their accounts to this password. Jeremy Gosney, an internet security researcher, made a list of the top 100 passwords used in the affected accounts however the passwords are not verified. The next 2 popular passwords were “123456789” and “password”. I think that most people used these as security measures because they are easy to remember, but I just feel like they’re a big target for hackers. I remember making easy passwords myself back then when I had multiple accounts with various companies. Maybe people should try using more complicated passwords from now on. They can possibly use just numbers and letters without using an actual word that’s in the dictionary. I recall UT denying me usage of my password because it contained words that are in the dictionary. Maybe that’s what is required to be more safe nowadays.

Here’s the article link if y’all are interested in reading more about it

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2013/11/06/123456-adobe-hack-highlights-crummy-passwords/

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2 thoughts on “Weekly Blog

  1. Hey Lauren, cool blog post! You should definitely check out James Pinkerton’s blog posts, they are breathtaking and compelling. When I read his beautiful prose I cry every time. Check his stuff out.

  2. Awesome point you make here, check out this similar blog https://hackingrhetoric.wordpress.com/author/meaganmilligan/

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